All Announcements

  • Earth Day Concert by University Symphony and Wind Ensembles

    Posted: Tuesday, April 22 Tonight's concert begins at 7:30 p.m. in Lipinsky Auditorium. $5 admission includes N.C. state taxes.

    The University Symphony & Wind Ensemble
    Milton Crotts, director

    Tuesday Earth Day
    April 22, 2014 ~ 7:30 p.m. ~ Lipinsky Lobby

    University Symphony

    Spring from the “Four Seasons”........................................................................................ A. Vivaldi
       Allegro – Largo e pianissimo sempre – Danza Pastorale

    Concerto Grosso No. 8, Opus 6.................................................................................... G. F. Handel
       Allemande: Andante – Grave – Andante allegro – Allegro  

    Allegro from Autumn of the “Four Seasons”......................................................................... Vivaldi

    Wind Septet

    Shenandoah...................................................................................... arranged by Ricky Lombardo

    Wind Ensemble

    National Fencibles March ................................................................................................ J. P. Sousa  

    Ye Banks and Braes O’Bonnie Doon........................................................... Percy Aldridge Grainger  

    In a Gentle Rain from The Wilson Suite......................................................................... R.W. Smith
        Andrew Leake, euphonium solo  

    Ricercar del primo tuono from Ricercari sopra li touni a quattro voci Giovanni Pierluigi Da Palestrina  

    Irish Tune from County Derry................................................... Grainger, edited by R. Mark Rogers  

    The Crusaders March....................................................................................................... J. P. Sousa

     

  • Revised Originals - Four Student-Written & Directed Shows

    Posted: Tuesday, April 22 These short plays - approximately 20 minutes each - will be staged beginning 7 p.m. on Wednesday, April 23, in the Highsmith Grotto. Free and open to everyone.

    This Drama Department directing class project challenge was to find a public domain text and adapt it for contemporary audiences. 

    The directing students collaborated with: script development adviser, Anne Slatton in Mass Communication;  public domain text adviser and community connection consultant, Ken Betsalel; design and visual conceptualizing consultant, Igor Roussanooff; and directing and concept adviser, Laura Bond. The project was funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Engaged Collaborative Humanities grant.

    The Plays

    Teacher Taught - by Christina Desoto ~ A love triangle plays out inside a jazz bar.

    The Reckoning - by Adam  Wise ~ The story of a murderous barber and a florist

    Story About Stories  - by Kyle Blank ~ Two storytellers compete to tell the most interesting story.

    Jack and the Beans Talk - by Jacob Williams ~ What would happen if Jack played the lead role in other popular folktales?

  • Reclaiming Sacred Ground: Native American Self-Representation in Film

    Posted: Monday, April 21 This film series curated by UNC Asheville faculty continues with the film, "The Cherokee Word for Water," at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, April 23 at Pack Memorial Library in downtown Asheville. Admission is free and the public is invited to attend.

    Wilma Mankiller, the first woman to be elected chief of the modern Cherokee Nation, died in 2010, four years ago this month, but her legacy of service and leadership lives on in the feature-length film, The Cherokee Word for Water.

    Mo Brings Plenty and Kimberly Guerrero star as Charlie Soap and Wilma Mankiller in "The Cherokee Word for Water."Set in the early 1980s, The Cherokee Word for Water is based on the true story of a major project Mankiller led for the Cherokee Nation. This docudrama recreates the struggles of a young Mankiller as she works to bring running water to the rural, primarily Cherokee, community of Bell, Oklahoma. Directed by Mankiller’s husband and longtime community-development partner, Charlie Soap, the film portrays Mankiller’s fierce determination to mobilize an impoverished community to install almost 20 miles of water line, making use of their own voluntary labor and community spirit. The ultimate success of the Bell Waterline Project thrust Mankiller into tribal politics and led to her election as deputy chief in 1983 and then as principal chief in 1985. During her 12 years in elected office, Mankiller focused her efforts on improving Cherokee health, education, housing, and tribal government.

    At the April 23 film and discussion event, Mankiller's inspiring life will be discussed by guest speakers Charlie Soap, director of the film, and Kimberly Guerrero, the lead actress. This free program will be in the Lord Auditorium at Pack Memorial Library, 67 Haywood Street in Asheville, and will run from 6-9 p.m., with the film beginning promptly at 6:30. Light refreshments will be served.

    The Cherokee Word for Water is the final film in the four-part series, Reclaiming Sacred Ground: Native American Self-Representation in Film, which has been sponsored by UNC Asheville, Buncombe County Public Libraries, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. This event is presented in partnership with another library film series, 20th Century Women Leaders: Catalysts for Change, which is co-sponsored by the Friends of Pack Memorial Library and the North Carolina Humanities Council. The film features Native American actors Mo Brings Plenty as Charlie Soap and Kimberly Guerrero as Wilma Mankiller. Much of the film was shot on tribal lands. For further information about this event, please call Pack Memorial Library at 250-4717. Complete details about the film, including a movie trailer, are available on the film website.

  • Día del Niño / Day of the Child Festival April 27

    Posted: Friday, April 18 UNC Asheville students are participating in the Día del Niño / Day of the Child Festival, the second largest festival for the Latino community in WNC, which takes place from 12-6 p.m. on Sunday, April 27, in Jackson Park, Hendersonville.

    Working with Michelle Bettencourt, associate professor of foreign languages, students will staff UNC Asheville's booth, offering arts and crafts activities for children, getting a chance to hone their Spanish skills outside of the classroom, and providing a service to festival-going families.

    Día del Niño is a national festival in Mexico. The Hendersonville festival is also a business expo for organizations and businesses that work with/serve the Latino community in WNC. There will be lots of food, live music and dance from around the Spanish speaking world.

     

     

  • Ameena Batada Receives UNC Asheville Community Connectors Award

    Posted: Tuesday, April 15 Ameena Batada, assistant professor of health and wellness, has been named a recipient of UNC Asheville’s Community Connectors Award, given by the university’s Office for School and Community Outreach Programs and Partnerships (SCOPP) and the Key Center for Community Citizenship and Service Learning.

    Ameena Batada (center), with Jane Fernandes and Keith Ray. Photo by Perry Hebard.Batada focuses her academic work and community involvement on child health and education. She has engaged herself and her students in joint projects with the nationally focused Center for Science in the Public Interest and locally with area school systems, the Buncombe County Department of Health, and with ABIPA (Asheville Buncombe Institute of Parity Achievement), among others.

    Je’Wana Grier-McEachin, ABIPA executive director, said “being able to receive support from Dr. Batada and her students to conduct community surveys and synthesizing the data that we have been collecting over the years has been invaluable.  Her expertise and commitment to health equity is aiding us in telling our story, measuring our outcomes and impact.”

    Students who have worked with Batada and representatives of community organizations and churches joined together for a luncheon celebrating the Community Connectors Award on April 10. Among those attending were Grier-McEachin and Kathey Avery, nurse case manager of ABIPA; the Rev. Spence Hardaway of Rock Hill Missionary Baptist Church; Pastor A.L. Dyson and First Lady Valerie Dyson of Bethel Seventh-day Adventist Church; Alma Atkins, director of Buncombe County’s Minority Health Equity Project; senior Laura Lee Petritz; Professor of Sociology (retired) James Pitts; Provost Jane Fernandes; Lise Kloeppel, assistant professor of drama and director of the Key Center; Keith Ray, chair and associate professor of health and wellness; and Annie Burton, director of SCOPP.

    Michelle Bettencourt, associate professor of foreign languages, won the inaugural Community Connectors Award in December. To learn more about the award, and the work done by Batada and Bettencourt, visit the SCOPP website.

    From left, Valerie and Pastor A.L. Dyson, Ameena Batada, Je’Wana Grier-McEachin,  Kathey Avery,  Laura Lee Petritz, and  Alma Atkins. Photo by Perry Hebard.

  • Tommy Hays to Appear on Public TV's "Bookwatch" This Week

    Posted: Friday, April 11 Tommy Hays will discuss his novel, What I Came to Tell You, on UNC-TV's North Carolina Bookwatch, hosted by D.G. Martin. The segment will air at 9 p.m. on Sunday, April 27, and Thursday, May 1. For more information on the program, visit the http://www.unctv.org/content/ncbookwatch.

    Hays is director of UNC Asheville’s Great Smokies Writing Program and is a lecturer in the university’s Master of Liberal Arts Program. What I Came to Tell You is Hays’ fourth novel, but his first for younger readers; his 2006 novel, The Pleasure Was Mine, which dealt tenderly with adjustment to Alzheimer’s disease, was an NPR “Radio Reader” and was chosen for many community reads. For more information about Hays and What I Came to Tell You, visit tommyhays.com.

  • Pool Closed for Repairs

    Posted: Wednesday, April 2 Due to a leak in the main drain, the Student Recreation Center swimming pool is closed.

    Repairs will take at least 3-4 weeks. Please check the Campus Recreation website for updates.

  • Work by Lorraine Walsh is Part of "Impromptu" Exhibit at AAAC Gallery

    Posted: Wednesday, April 2 "Voice Me," a sound visualization/animation by Lorraine Walsh, associate professor of new media, is on display as part of the current exhibit at the Asheville Area Arts Council Gallery.

    "Voice Me" was culled from a collection of recordings from skateparks across the United States, from Charleston Skatepark, S.C. to Tanzanite Skatepark, Cal. The sounds were recorded by the skaters from the Sk8 the St8s adventure across the US, with special thanks to new media student, designer and production assistant Chantae Shor.

    Walsh's work is part of current exhibition,  Impromptu, how a second can change the outcome, curated by Martha Skinner. It will remain on view through April 25, with gallery hours 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, at 346 Depot Street in Asheville's River Arts District. For more information on the exhibition, visit the AAAC Gallery website.

  • American Chemical Society Award for Research at an Undergraduate Institution

    Posted: Wednesday, March 26 Bert Holmes, Philip G. Carlson Distinguished Chair and professor of chemistry, was awarded the American Chemical Society Award for Research at an Undergraduate Institution at the society's meeting in Dallas on March 18.

    The award states “For his research exploring the mechanism and measuring kinetic parameters of uni- and bimolecular reactions of halocarbons and his efforts promoting undergraduate research.”  Holmes also received an honorarium and the department a $5,000 grant from the Research Corporation for Scientific Advancement.

    Bert Holmes (left) receives the 2014 American Chemical Society Award for Research at an Undergraduate Institution from Jack  Pladziewicz, President of the Research Corporation for Science Advancement