Dwaine Eubanks to Deliver 2017 Squibb Lectures, Oct. 26 at UNC Asheville

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Dwaine Eubanks, an award-winning chemistry educator, will deliver UNC Asheville’s 20th annual S. Dexter Squibb Lectures on Thursday, Oct. 26 with a free public lecture at 11:45 a.m. and a private dinner and lecture that evening.

Eubanks completed both his undergraduate and graduate work at The University of Texas at Austin. He then began his career at the Savannah River Laboratory researching the properties of lanthanides, but he became more interested in the properties and practices that lead students to succeed or fail in chemistry, and returned to academe. He went on to become the 2015 winner of the George C. Pimentel award – the oldest and most prestigious chemistry education award American Chemical Society. His 11:45 a.m. public lecture is titled, How Do We Know That They Know What We Know They Should Know? The Challenges of Cognitive Assessment. That talk, free and open to everyone, will take place in UNC Asheville’s Rhoades Robinson Hall Room 125.

Eubanks has authored and illustrated chemistry textbooks, directed the general chemistry program of Oklahoma State University and later served on the faculty of Clemson University for more than a decade. For 15 years, he directed the ACS Examinations Institute, which produced standardized examinations for high school and university chemistry courses, and graduate school admission and placement exams. Although officially retired, Eubanks continues to produce technical illustrations for ACS publications, and he directs Clemson’s Emeritus College which provides services to that university’s students, faculty and administration.

The 2017 S. Dexter Squibb Lectures are the first following Squibb’s death in June at the age of 85. Squibb led the development of UNC Asheville’s Department of Chemistry and chaired the department for three decades, from 1964-1994. He also helped advance the study of chemistry at Western Carolina University and Eckerd College in Florida, and he served as a visiting professor at UNC-Chapel Hill and Clemson University.

Squibb will be honored posthumously at a private dinner the evening of Oct. 26 for friends of the Department of Chemistry and the Squibb family. Eubanks will provide a dinner talk placing Squibb's contributions in the context of the changing landscape of chemistry education.

For more information, contact Mitra Sadeghian in the Department of Chemistry, at msadeghi@unca.edu or 828.251.6443.